Drama

If someone is holding a weapon at you and you have information that can save your life, what would you do?

That’s right, shout it.  Scream it, whisper if you had to, but you’d *tell* them.

At least, I hope you would.  I hope you wouldn’t say things like, “Just let me tell you what happened” or “Please listen” and hang your life on the chance that they gave you permission to talk.

What has inspired this little tirade, you ask?  Drama in the book I’m reading, the third in the series about the wizard with the lightning-bolt scar.  I would give you a spoiler alert, but really, if you haven’t read it yet then you are either not going to read it or should have read it already.

I’m just past the scene with Harry threatening to kill Black in the Shrieking Shack.  Several times (at least three!) Black has a chance to say “But it was really Peter Pettigrew” but he doesn’t say it.  I mean, really!  I understand the concept of drama, and suspense, and if I hadn’t read it before I’d probably be shouting “Kill him already!” instead.  But I find myself shouting, “Just tell him, you idiot!” several times, and it’s just a bit much.

Okay, I feel better.  Tirade complete, now back to the book.  I’m ready for Harry to learn the truth (clearly) and it won’t happen with the cover closed.

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3 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. deshipley
    Dec 30, 2011 @ 18:03:30

    The plus and the downside of fictional dialogue: It has the potential to be spun out so much better than real life, thanks to the magic of planning and editing and the other guy never having to say anything other than just the right thing to set up the punch-line. But alas, it is a power which, for various intended effects, is far too easily mishandled. It seems to happen at least once in every book/movie/TV show episode — that “oh, for crying out loud, JUST *SAY* IT!” moment. I’m probably guilty of it, too, though goodness knows I try to keep it to a minimum!

    Reply

  2. Jeyna Grace
    Dec 30, 2011 @ 22:03:40

    I felt the same way as well. But suspense always has to be built.

    Reply

  3. WhitneyCarter
    Jan 08, 2012 @ 19:04:21

    As frustrating as they are, these moments are really cool from a teaching perspective because if you can take a step back and examine what’s really happening and why it bugs you, you can help yourself avoid doing the same thing.

    Reply

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